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Art of protest: Graffiti of discontent transforms Chile

A woman walks in front of graffiti reading \
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A woman walks in front of graffiti reading "Chile woke up" during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, Chile October 30, 2019. A month of intense protests against inequality and police repression in Santiago have transformed the Chilean capital's streetscape into a caterwaul of graffiti whose messages reflect the deep discontent in this once genteel Latin American city. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Graffiti depicting an injured eye is seen during a protest against the government in Santiago, November 13. The messages also reflect a horrifying, and largely unique, characteristic of the Chilean protests: the injuries to more than 200 people\u0027s eyes by police rubber bullets or tear gas canisters. Police insist they have followed protocol in the use of force and that all allegations of wrongdoing that have been reported will be thoroughly investigated.

The police chief last week suspended the use of rubber bullets and ordered further tests after a university study suggested they were only 20% rubber and contained lead. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Graffiti depicting an injured eye is seen during a protest against the government in Santiago, November 13. The messages also reflect a horrifying, and largely unique, characteristic of the Chilean protests: the injuries to more than 200 people's eyes by police rubber bullets or tear gas canisters. Police insist they have followed protocol in the use of force and that all allegations of wrongdoing that have been reported will be thoroughly investigated. The police chief last week suspended the use of rubber bullets and ordered further tests after a university study suggested they were only 20% rubber and contained lead. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
The entrance of the metro station at Gabriela Mistral Cultural Center is seen in Santiago, November 16. The subway network, one of Latin America\u0027s most modern, continues to run at half-strength, with more than 20 stations still closed after arson attacks. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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The entrance of the metro station at Gabriela Mistral Cultural Center is seen in Santiago, November 16. The subway network, one of Latin America's most modern, continues to run at half-strength, with more than 20 stations still closed after arson attacks. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Members of the security forces gather in front of graffiti depicting Chilean President Pinera injured on the head during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago November 15.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Members of the security forces gather in front of graffiti depicting Chilean President Pinera injured on the head during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago November 15. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A protester poses in front of graffiti during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A protester poses in front of graffiti during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A Graffiti depicting Picasso\u0027s Guernica with Chile\u0027s protest details is seen in Santiago, November 22. In Lastarria, the most popular tourist area of downtown Santiago, a mural reinterpreting Pablo Picasso\u0027s celebrated Guernica features Pinera as a snorting bull, police special forces as horses, clouds of teargas, flames from burning metro stations and rubber bullets in the air. REUTERS/Natalia Ramos
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A Graffiti depicting Picasso's Guernica with Chile's protest details is seen in Santiago, November 22. In Lastarria, the most popular tourist area of downtown Santiago, a mural reinterpreting Pablo Picasso's celebrated Guernica features Pinera as a snorting bull, police special forces as horses, clouds of teargas, flames from burning metro stations and rubber bullets in the air. REUTERS/Natalia Ramos

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A wall with graffiti and political messages is seen during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 1. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A wall with graffiti and political messages is seen during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 1. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A woman poses in front of a mirror with a red dot placed as installation art during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 16.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A woman poses in front of a mirror with a red dot placed as installation art during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Police are seen next to graffiti during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago November 5.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Police are seen next to graffiti during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago November 5. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A Scotiabank gate is seen graffitied during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 1.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A Scotiabank gate is seen graffitied during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 1. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A man wearing a medieval helmet gets ready to confront police during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A man wearing a medieval helmet gets ready to confront police during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A set of toy soldiers are seen attached to a subway entrance in front of Gabriela Mistral Cultural Center during a protest against the government in Santiago, November 13. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A set of toy soldiers are seen attached to a subway entrance in front of Gabriela Mistral Cultural Center during a protest against the government in Santiago, November 13. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
People stand near graffiti during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago November 16.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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People stand near graffiti during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Protesters gather on the street in front of a graffitied wall during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Protesters gather on the street in front of a graffitied wall during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A poster reading, \
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A poster reading, "they will never have the comfort of our silence again", is seen on a wall in Santiago, November 5. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Women stand next to a wall during a protest against the government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Women stand next to a wall during a protest against the government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A painted monument is seen during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, October 30.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A painted monument is seen during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, October 30. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A wall with posters and graffiti is seen during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago November 5.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A wall with posters and graffiti is seen during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago November 5. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
People walk past graffiti reading, \
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People walk past graffiti reading, "The state does not love you" in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Graffiti is seen during a protest against the government in Santiago, October 31. The graffiti reads, \
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Graffiti is seen during a protest against the government in Santiago, October 31. The graffiti reads, "no more deaths" and "if the revolution is required, then it is possible". REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
People stand near graffiti during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 16. Graffiti reads, \
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People stand near graffiti during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. Graffiti reads, "Police assassin". REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Graffiti depicting Chilean President Sebastian Pinera is seen in a wall during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 13.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Graffiti depicting Chilean President Sebastian Pinera is seen in a wall during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 13. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A woman walks past graffiti reading \
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A woman walks past graffiti reading "Chile torture" during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Debris, banners and graffiti are seen as riot police officers stand guard at Baquedano subway station in Plaza Italia during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 4. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Debris, banners and graffiti are seen as riot police officers stand guard at Baquedano subway station in Plaza Italia during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 4. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A poster depicting Chilean President Sebastian Pinera with a noose is seen on a wall during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, October 31.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A poster depicting Chilean President Sebastian Pinera with a noose is seen on a wall during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, October 31. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
People walk by store gates with graffiti during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 16.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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People walk by store gates with graffiti during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A wall with graffiti and political messages is seen during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, October 31. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A wall with graffiti and political messages is seen during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, October 31. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A man walks past a graffitied shop during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, October 29.  REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A man walks past a graffitied shop during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, October 29. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
A woman sits next to graffiti reading, \
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A woman sits next to graffiti reading, "Now is a privilege to have to both eyes" during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
Graffiti is seen on a metal door protecting a shop during a protest against Chile\u0027s government in Santiago, November 16. Text reads, \
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Graffiti is seen on a metal door protecting a shop during a protest against Chile's government in Santiago, November 16. Text reads, "The street is ours". REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Nov 26, 2019 11:15 AM EST
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