Menu
Search
|

Menu

Close
X

Pictures

Charlottesville confronts identity one year after clashes

Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed during the August 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, looks at mementos of her daughter in her office in Charlottesville, Virginia. As Charlottesville prepares for the one-year anniversary this weekend, it is still agonizing over clashes last year in which one woman was killed when an Ohio man drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder
1 / 20

Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed during the August 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, looks at mementos of her daughter in her office in Charlottesville, Virginia. As Charlottesville prepares for the one-year anniversary this weekend, it is still agonizing over clashes last year in which one woman was killed when an Ohio man drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A woman walks past tributes written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed in Charlottesville. For many residents of Charlottesville, Virginia, last year\u0027s white nationalist rally shattered the city\u0027s carefully curated reputation as a progressive, idyllic place to live.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder
2 / 20

A woman walks past tributes written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed in Charlottesville. For many residents of Charlottesville, Virginia, last year's white nationalist rally shattered the city's carefully curated reputation as a progressive, idyllic place to live. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A Confederate battle flag flies over the I-64 highway, outside Charlottesville. But for Nikuyah Walker, an activist who was elected mayor just three months later, the violent clashes only underscored deep racial and economic inequities that have long divided this picturesque college town. In her view, the rally has forced Charlottesville to confront its own complicated legacy. \
3 / 20

A Confederate battle flag flies over the I-64 highway, outside Charlottesville. But for Nikuyah Walker, an activist who was elected mayor just three months later, the violent clashes only underscored deep racial and economic inequities that have long divided this picturesque college town. In her view, the rally has forced Charlottesville to confront its own complicated legacy. "You can have three or four generations who are struggling, and that family has not been able to move out of poverty wages -- that's a significant portion of Charlottesville," Walker, the city's first black female mayor, told Reuters outside City Hall. "And then you have this very wealthy community that loves and raves about it." REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A U.S. flag flies from the back of a car in Charlottesville. Some residents have argued that the vast majority of the marchers last year were from out of town, but Walker said that narrative ignores the city\u0027s broader problems. She noted that the main instigators of the \
4 / 20

A U.S. flag flies from the back of a car in Charlottesville. Some residents have argued that the vast majority of the marchers last year were from out of town, but Walker said that narrative ignores the city's broader problems. She noted that the main instigators of the "Unite the Right" rally, Richard Spencer, who coined the term "alt-right" to describe the loose coalition of white nationalists, and Jason Kessler, a local blogger, graduated from the University of Virginia on the western side of town. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A statue of Civil War Confederate General Thomas \
5 / 20

A statue of Civil War Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson stands in a park in Charlottesville. The rally was billed as a protest over the city council's plan to remove two Confederate statues from downtown parks. Last year, a judge blocked the city from taking down the statues, which are encircled by orange plastic fencing and are off-limits to residents. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A sign against racism stands outside a church in Charlottesville. Several officials including the police chief, the city manager and the city attorney left their positions after widespread criticism that Charlottesville had been ill-prepared to manage the hundreds of white nationalists who descended upon it, many armed with shields, clubs and other weapons. \
6 / 20

A sign against racism stands outside a church in Charlottesville. Several officials including the police chief, the city manager and the city attorney left their positions after widespread criticism that Charlottesville had been ill-prepared to manage the hundreds of white nationalists who descended upon it, many armed with shields, clubs and other weapons. "We recognize that we have to earn the community's trust," said Brian Wheeler, the city's chief spokesman. "The way that we can best do that this year is learn from the mistakes." REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A homeless man lies in the park in front the statue of Confederate Civil War General Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville. Local and state police have vowed to have zero tolerance for any violence this weekend, in stark contrast with last year when some officers did not intervene to break up fights. Virtually the entire downtown will be closed to vehicles. Police have said that they are preparing for the worst, even though Kessler, who organized last year\u0027s event, lost a bid to get a permit this year. Instead, he has received permission to rally outside the White House on Sunday and has said he will focus on Washington.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder
7 / 20

A homeless man lies in the park in front the statue of Confederate Civil War General Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville. Local and state police have vowed to have zero tolerance for any violence this weekend, in stark contrast with last year when some officers did not intervene to break up fights. Virtually the entire downtown will be closed to vehicles. Police have said that they are preparing for the worst, even though Kessler, who organized last year's event, lost a bid to get a permit this year. Instead, he has received permission to rally outside the White House on Sunday and has said he will focus on Washington. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
\
8 / 20

"R.I.P." is written on the wall at the site where Heather Heyer was killed in Charlottesville. The effects of last year's violence are still felt every day in Charlottesville. City council meetings have frequently devolved into shouting matches. At a recent community outreach meeting where police officials detailed security plans for this weekend, residents asked one after another how they were supposed to trust the police after 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
\
9 / 20

"Charlottesville has had a tendency to self-congratulation; it's constantly in the magazines as the best place to live," said Reverend Will Peyton (pictured), who oversees St. Paul's Episcopal Church. "The violence was perpetrated by outsiders, yes, but the response from the black community is like, 'Really, this isn't us? We don't have a problem here?' Because, of course, there's entrenched inequality and entrenched structural racism," Peyton said. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
At the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center in downtown Charlottesville, an exhibit documents the struggle of black residents who fought for equal access to public education. \
10 / 20

At the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center in downtown Charlottesville, an exhibit documents the struggle of black residents who fought for equal access to public education. "I don't know that people understood that this narrative of progressive Charlottesville had flaws," said Andrea Douglas (pictured), the center's executive director. "Now those flaws have been exposed." REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
\
11 / 20

"End White Supremacy" is written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed in Charlottesville. When Mayor Walker, 38, announced her run for city council last spring after years of activism on behalf of low-income residents, she adopted the motto "Unmasking the Illusion," aiming to dispel the notion that Charlottesville was a diverse, liberal utopia. She has focused her attention on issues like affordable housing and policing. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
The gravestones of Civil War Confederate soldiers stand in the Confederate cemetery in Charlottesville. Last month, Mayor Walker joined residents on what they called a \
12 / 20

The gravestones of Civil War Confederate soldiers stand in the Confederate cemetery in Charlottesville. Last month, Mayor Walker joined residents on what they called a "civil rights pilgrimage" to the lynching museum in Montgomery, Alabama, bringing along soil from a site where a black Charlottesville man was lynched in 1898. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A statue of Civil War Confederate General Robert E. Lee stands in a park in Charlottesville. Reverend Tracy Howe Wispelwey, a local activist, said last year\u0027s rally was eye-opening for many in Charlottesville. \
13 / 20

A statue of Civil War Confederate General Robert E. Lee stands in a park in Charlottesville. Reverend Tracy Howe Wispelwey, a local activist, said last year's rally was eye-opening for many in Charlottesville. "You have a lot of white liberals who have not grappled with our history and want to dismiss it," she said. "That's just not truth." REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
Every few weeks, Susan Bro walks down 4th Street in downtown Charlottesville, Virginia, until she gets to a brick wall covered in chalked messages like \
14 / 20

Every few weeks, Susan Bro walks down 4th Street in downtown Charlottesville, Virginia, until she gets to a brick wall covered in chalked messages like "Love over hate" and "Gone but not forgotten." "I come just to absorb the energy of the place," Bro, 61, said as she stood on the block now named for her daughter, Heather Heyer. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
\
15 / 20

"The 'firsts' are always hardest," she said, her voice cracking. "I got through the others: Mother's Day, her birthday, Christmas. This will be the last one." Bro said she would bring flowers to Heather Heyer Way on August 12 before speaking at an event to mark the anniversary. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A local Sheriff patrols past the site where Heather Heyer was killed. Within weeks of Heyer\u0027s death, Bro created the Heather Heyer Foundation, in part to install a formal and legal structure to handle the hundreds of thousands of dollars in funds that poured in from sympathizers around the country. Bro runs the foundation from her home and from an office at a Charlottesville law firm, filled with tributes to Heyer that she has received over the last year: a portrait painted by an artist, a humanitarian award given posthumously by the Muhammad Ali Center, notes written by Heyer\u0027s friends at her memorial service. The foundation has organized a scholarship program and is planning to launch a social justice youth program.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder
16 / 20

A local Sheriff patrols past the site where Heather Heyer was killed. Within weeks of Heyer's death, Bro created the Heather Heyer Foundation, in part to install a formal and legal structure to handle the hundreds of thousands of dollars in funds that poured in from sympathizers around the country. Bro runs the foundation from her home and from an office at a Charlottesville law firm, filled with tributes to Heyer that she has received over the last year: a portrait painted by an artist, a humanitarian award given posthumously by the Muhammad Ali Center, notes written by Heyer's friends at her memorial service. The foundation has organized a scholarship program and is planning to launch a social justice youth program. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A young woman reads under a statue of Civil War Confederate General Thomas \
17 / 20

A young woman reads under a statue of Civil War Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson in a park. It has been a bit of a balancing act, Bro said, to amplify Heyer's message without making it seem as though her daughter was the only victim who mattered. She noted that violence against black people often does not generate the same level of interest and warned against the "white-centered" narrative that portrayed Heyer as a leader rather than simply one of many people who decided to march. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A man walks past tributes written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed. \
18 / 20

A man walks past tributes written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed. "The issues have not changed," Bro said. "We still have police shootings, over-policing, a lack of affordable housing, the prison pipeline." A year after burying her daughter, Bro reflected on the activism that brought Heyer to the protests. "The point of Heather's death is that we have a responsibility to rise up to address that hate," Bro said. "Don't sit by and wring your hands." REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A gravestone reading \
19 / 20

A gravestone reading "Hagar Faithful Servant," according to the local government the grave of a domestic servant or slave of R.K. Meade named Newton Hagar, stands in Maplewood Cemetery in Charlottesville. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
A memorial to Civil War Confederate soldiers stands in the Confederate cemetery in Charlottesville. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
20 / 20

A memorial to Civil War Confederate soldiers stands in the Confederate cemetery in Charlottesville. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Aug 10, 2018 8:40 PM EDT
ADVERTISEMENT

Trending Collections

MORE IN PICTURES

ADVERTISEMENT

PICTURES OF THE MONTH

SPONSORED STORIES